What the Plum?

What the Plum?

I appreciate your visit, but seriously, how'd you get here?

Did anyone else notice that the history book Mabel uses in her Guide to Stickers mentions an ancient Greek Robot War and an Aztec dog becoming Santa’s most special reindeer?

500daysofevilexes:

JonTron is a comedian who makes fun of games online. He has a fanbase that rivals the most popular of YouTubers, and up until today very few people had anything negative to say about him.
At some point today, he used the word “retarded” to describe a PS4, and everything went to hell. If you asked Tumblr or Twitter, you’d have thought that the guy burned an orphanage to the ground.
Now here’s the deal: When you’re that famous, nothing gets past your fans. You can’t say “retarded” to describe anything or anyone (no one should, really). So JonTron made a mistake here and used an offensive word in passing to describe something frustrating. 
And the internet exploded. 
I want everyone to know that I’m not “siding” with JonTron here, because I’m not a fucking 12-year-old who “takes sides.” He made a mistake and didn’t publicly apologize for it, and that can be frustrating. However, how did all of this blow out of proportion anyway?
It goes back to the bizarre mentality of ganging up on people via the internet, hashtag hate, and clicktivism. JonTron is well-known and made a mistake, and it’s easier for us to blindly attack as a group than to attack as individuals. Countless studies have shown that human beings want to feel as if they belong, especially people who don’t normally feel like they belong anywhere (which is a majority of people of Tumblr). So they will join internet crusades in sorry attempts to take down YouTube celebrities because, you know, it’s a bandwagon that they can feel high and mighty while a part of.
I think that a large majority of social justice warriors suffer from the mentality of “I need to feel like I belong.” It’s why they knock so many innocent people down in awful ways while simultaneously boosting other lonely, desperate people up. 
In reality, however, this whole “attack on JonTron” did nothing but prove how ridiculous hashtag hate and clicktivism really is. People have been reblogging things like “I hope JonTron gets shipped up to Israel and gets blown up by a missile”, which is infinitely more offensive than JonTron’s original slip-up.
Why is it that responses and threats to people who have offended you are allowed to be more violent and offensive than the remark made by the person you’re attacking?
I can’t believe that I need to say this, but there are so many worse things happening in the world than an internet celebrity calling a video game system retarded.
To close, let me just show all of you clicktivists how you look to the rest of the world:

Way to save the world, guys.
500daysofevilexes:

JonTron is a comedian who makes fun of games online. He has a fanbase that rivals the most popular of YouTubers, and up until today very few people had anything negative to say about him.
At some point today, he used the word “retarded” to describe a PS4, and everything went to hell. If you asked Tumblr or Twitter, you’d have thought that the guy burned an orphanage to the ground.
Now here’s the deal: When you’re that famous, nothing gets past your fans. You can’t say “retarded” to describe anything or anyone (no one should, really). So JonTron made a mistake here and used an offensive word in passing to describe something frustrating. 
And the internet exploded. 
I want everyone to know that I’m not “siding” with JonTron here, because I’m not a fucking 12-year-old who “takes sides.” He made a mistake and didn’t publicly apologize for it, and that can be frustrating. However, how did all of this blow out of proportion anyway?
It goes back to the bizarre mentality of ganging up on people via the internet, hashtag hate, and clicktivism. JonTron is well-known and made a mistake, and it’s easier for us to blindly attack as a group than to attack as individuals. Countless studies have shown that human beings want to feel as if they belong, especially people who don’t normally feel like they belong anywhere (which is a majority of people of Tumblr). So they will join internet crusades in sorry attempts to take down YouTube celebrities because, you know, it’s a bandwagon that they can feel high and mighty while a part of.
I think that a large majority of social justice warriors suffer from the mentality of “I need to feel like I belong.” It’s why they knock so many innocent people down in awful ways while simultaneously boosting other lonely, desperate people up. 
In reality, however, this whole “attack on JonTron” did nothing but prove how ridiculous hashtag hate and clicktivism really is. People have been reblogging things like “I hope JonTron gets shipped up to Israel and gets blown up by a missile”, which is infinitely more offensive than JonTron’s original slip-up.
Why is it that responses and threats to people who have offended you are allowed to be more violent and offensive than the remark made by the person you’re attacking?
I can’t believe that I need to say this, but there are so many worse things happening in the world than an internet celebrity calling a video game system retarded.
To close, let me just show all of you clicktivists how you look to the rest of the world:

Way to save the world, guys.
500daysofevilexes:

JonTron is a comedian who makes fun of games online. He has a fanbase that rivals the most popular of YouTubers, and up until today very few people had anything negative to say about him.
At some point today, he used the word “retarded” to describe a PS4, and everything went to hell. If you asked Tumblr or Twitter, you’d have thought that the guy burned an orphanage to the ground.
Now here’s the deal: When you’re that famous, nothing gets past your fans. You can’t say “retarded” to describe anything or anyone (no one should, really). So JonTron made a mistake here and used an offensive word in passing to describe something frustrating. 
And the internet exploded. 
I want everyone to know that I’m not “siding” with JonTron here, because I’m not a fucking 12-year-old who “takes sides.” He made a mistake and didn’t publicly apologize for it, and that can be frustrating. However, how did all of this blow out of proportion anyway?
It goes back to the bizarre mentality of ganging up on people via the internet, hashtag hate, and clicktivism. JonTron is well-known and made a mistake, and it’s easier for us to blindly attack as a group than to attack as individuals. Countless studies have shown that human beings want to feel as if they belong, especially people who don’t normally feel like they belong anywhere (which is a majority of people of Tumblr). So they will join internet crusades in sorry attempts to take down YouTube celebrities because, you know, it’s a bandwagon that they can feel high and mighty while a part of.
I think that a large majority of social justice warriors suffer from the mentality of “I need to feel like I belong.” It’s why they knock so many innocent people down in awful ways while simultaneously boosting other lonely, desperate people up. 
In reality, however, this whole “attack on JonTron” did nothing but prove how ridiculous hashtag hate and clicktivism really is. People have been reblogging things like “I hope JonTron gets shipped up to Israel and gets blown up by a missile”, which is infinitely more offensive than JonTron’s original slip-up.
Why is it that responses and threats to people who have offended you are allowed to be more violent and offensive than the remark made by the person you’re attacking?
I can’t believe that I need to say this, but there are so many worse things happening in the world than an internet celebrity calling a video game system retarded.
To close, let me just show all of you clicktivists how you look to the rest of the world:

Way to save the world, guys.

500daysofevilexes:

JonTron is a comedian who makes fun of games online. He has a fanbase that rivals the most popular of YouTubers, and up until today very few people had anything negative to say about him.

At some point today, he used the word “retarded” to describe a PS4, and everything went to hell. If you asked Tumblr or Twitter, you’d have thought that the guy burned an orphanage to the ground.

Now here’s the deal: When you’re that famous, nothing gets past your fans. You can’t say “retarded” to describe anything or anyone (no one should, really). So JonTron made a mistake here and used an offensive word in passing to describe something frustrating. 

And the internet exploded. 

I want everyone to know that I’m not “siding” with JonTron here, because I’m not a fucking 12-year-old who “takes sides.” He made a mistake and didn’t publicly apologize for it, and that can be frustrating. However, how did all of this blow out of proportion anyway?

It goes back to the bizarre mentality of ganging up on people via the internet, hashtag hate, and clicktivism. JonTron is well-known and made a mistake, and it’s easier for us to blindly attack as a group than to attack as individuals. Countless studies have shown that human beings want to feel as if they belong, especially people who don’t normally feel like they belong anywhere (which is a majority of people of Tumblr). So they will join internet crusades in sorry attempts to take down YouTube celebrities because, you know, it’s a bandwagon that they can feel high and mighty while a part of.

I think that a large majority of social justice warriors suffer from the mentality of “I need to feel like I belong.” It’s why they knock so many innocent people down in awful ways while simultaneously boosting other lonely, desperate people up. 

In reality, however, this whole “attack on JonTron” did nothing but prove how ridiculous hashtag hate and clicktivism really is. People have been reblogging things like “I hope JonTron gets shipped up to Israel and gets blown up by a missile”, which is infinitely more offensive than JonTron’s original slip-up.

Why is it that responses and threats to people who have offended you are allowed to be more violent and offensive than the remark made by the person you’re attacking?

I can’t believe that I need to say this, but there are so many worse things happening in the world than an internet celebrity calling a video game system retarded.

To close, let me just show all of you clicktivists how you look to the rest of the world:

image

Way to save the world, guys.

Write a one sentence love story between two inanimate objects. Bonus points if they engage in coitus.

What the Plum?
chuckpalahniuk answered:

I’m not your bitch.  You write it.  


mildlyamused:

nightrevelations:

princess-slay-ya:

In Star Wars, a boy can grow up to be a knight or a wizard, but if you’re a girl, you have one good role model- one good, sexy role model- but you better be born a princess or good at space hooking, cuz those are your options [x]

#it took me an embarrassingly long time to realize #that leia was put in that outfit as a form of punishment and humilliation #ostensibly by jabba #but really by the filmmakers

ALWAYS REBLOG

Can’t justify the other two, but the metal bikini WAS partially Fisher’s idea. (x)

Also did everyone suddenly forget about Senator Mon Mothma?

stuffman:

image

People have written a lot of touchy-feely pieces on this subject but I thought I’d get right to the heart of the matter

beauty is everywhere
beauty is everywhere

beauty is everywhere

Oakland debut: 7 innings, 5 strikeouts, 4 hits, 1 run, and 1 fantastic head of hair
Oakland debut: 7 innings, 5 strikeouts, 4 hits, 1 run, and 1 fantastic head of hair

Oakland debut: 7 innings, 5 strikeouts, 4 hits, 1 run, and 1 fantastic head of hair

re-enlist-with-mash-4077:

kattails-tickettoride:

I love this crossover :)

This is genius.
re-enlist-with-mash-4077:

kattails-tickettoride:

I love this crossover :)

This is genius.
re-enlist-with-mash-4077:

kattails-tickettoride:

I love this crossover :)

This is genius.

re-enlist-with-mash-4077:

kattails-tickettoride:

I love this crossover :)

This is genius.

it never gets old. Toronto @ Oakland 3 July, 2014

chuckpalahniuk:

I wanted to share this poster we made for the Graphic Design Festival Breda which was held last month. We designed a typography poster with a visual update of a quote from the movie Fight Club. The poster was one of the winners of the Reflect - Poster Project.
The movie Fight Club was released in 1999, a pre-social media era. Tyler Durden was literally talking about our possessions, and how they can dominate and take over our lives. Fast-forwarding to the present there might be something else that made us slaves to our possessions. Putting Tyler Durden’s statement in a whole new perspective.
chuckpalahniuk:

I wanted to share this poster we made for the Graphic Design Festival Breda which was held last month. We designed a typography poster with a visual update of a quote from the movie Fight Club. The poster was one of the winners of the Reflect - Poster Project.
The movie Fight Club was released in 1999, a pre-social media era. Tyler Durden was literally talking about our possessions, and how they can dominate and take over our lives. Fast-forwarding to the present there might be something else that made us slaves to our possessions. Putting Tyler Durden’s statement in a whole new perspective.

chuckpalahniuk:

I wanted to share this poster we made for the Graphic Design Festival Breda which was held last month. We designed a typography poster with a visual update of a quote from the movie Fight Club. The poster was one of the winners of the Reflect - Poster Project.

The movie Fight Club was released in 1999, a pre-social media era. Tyler Durden was literally talking about our possessions, and how they can dominate and take over our lives. Fast-forwarding to the present there might be something else that made us slaves to our possessions. Putting Tyler Durden’s statement in a whole new perspective.

meme-meme:

stabilized star trek shot
meme-meme:

stabilized star trek shot
meme-meme:

stabilized star trek shot

meme-meme:

stabilized star trek shot